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What's New?Vintage Press InformationAn 'Ironside' Title and Airdate ListingOriginal NBC Stills ArchiveVintage Magazine Features'Ironside' CollectablesEditorials and Analytical FeaturesLinks
What's New?Vintage Press InformationAn 'Ironside' Title and Airdate ListingOriginal NBC Stills ArchiveVintage Magazine FeaturesIronside' CollectablesEditorials and Analytical FeaturesLinks
 THE WASHINGTON EVENING STARFriday, September 15, 1967 
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ON THE AIR
 
‘Ironside’ Wheels Into View
 
By BERNIE HARRISON

 
Star TV Critic
 
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That first weekly episode last night (on NBC-4) of ‘Ironside’ played almost like a Perry Mason episode, I thought, except that Raymond Burr kept raising his voice and hollering at the help. The fact that Ironside is wheelchair-bound (after an accident explained in the made-for-TV movie that introduced the series) probably will make little difference. As Perry Mason, Burr didn't get around much, either. The lawyer had a detective who did his legwork.
 
What was sharply disappointing about last night's opener, which was about an inside robbery at the racetrack, was the lack of excitement, either in the development of the story, the outcome or the dialogue. Nor were those quick scenes, intended to develop the character of Ironside and his aides, revealing or effective.
 
“Patterns, patterns, — that's the way police solve crimes,” Ironside said briskly at one point.
 
Patterns, patterns, that's the way TV operates, too.
 
I'd like to see an occasional whudunit with a few surprises in it, but that, I think, is contrary to the unwritten TV law. That's the one that goes: Don't get the audience too excited, they might forget the commercial.
 
Last night, for example, you knew that the well-known actor with only one page of script in an opening scene was going to show up later. James Gregory did, of course, turning out to be the villain.
 
Burr probably is strong enough as a TV actor and personality to carry a series, including this one. Fictional policemen and detectives invariably have some distinguishing gimmick or personality trait, but I wish they'd found something not quite too limiting as immobility.
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